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FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » “Other” forums » Yesterday 3:23 PM

Daze
Replies: 48

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MS wrote:

My main concern is we don’t seem to be helping alot of the newer owners

I think you hit the nail on the head there but indirectly.  Most of the members of this forum have been so for 10, 15 or more years and in that time many of the Mustang projects (not mine ) have been "finished".  There is less to talk about when your car is done.  Finding a way to add new blood would revive this forum, and was already stated search engines are a big part of that.  4 or 5 years ago my website, including all of its pages, got at total of 5000-8000 hits a month, but now I am averaging 1500.  If you search restoration or Mustang you get people selling things and not the free exchange of information that was once available.  Not only that people would rather watch a video on youtube than read an article so there has been a huge shift there.  It takes work to READ all the posts in a thread and no work to click play.
 

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Home made cam bearing tool » 9/25/2020 10:28 PM

Daze
Replies: 8

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Bearings are in!!!
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/3906/YPGFdU.jpg

Tool worked amazingly well.  I am so glad I built a Ford specific tool based off of cam measurements as it allowed me to see an issue before I test fit the cam.  Bearings 5-4 went in with no problem and the driver slid out without issue after the install.  On bearing 1 however the puck was tight after installing the bearing and I had to push it out with my hand.  This told me the cam would also be tight and as expected when I test fit the cam bearing 1 had two little high spots that needed to be dealt with.  Once smoothed off the cam turned as it should. MS your advice as usual was spot on.

MS wrote:

One thing I have learned through quite a few rebuilds... ALWAYS install the cam bearings and cam as THE VERY FIRST THING YOU DO..... If not, a bearing might have to get a burr shaved off, and that requires cleaning the entire block again, which is impossible with the reciprocating assembly in there.

I did make two modifications to the tool.  I cut an 8" piece off of the shaft so that the main shaft was shorter and so that I had a smaller driver handle to install bearing 1.  I also wanted a hardened steel cap on the hammering end of both drivers.  After thinking of lots of different options, including welding a cap plate or cutting a handle off of a punch I finally decide a 5/8" grade 8 bolt would be a perfect solution.
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8706/scZjHL.jpg



 

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Home made cam bearing tool » 9/24/2020 5:54 PM

Daze
Replies: 8

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The only thing that is steel is the rod and the head flange the aluminum pucks bolt too.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » hydraulic clutch » 9/23/2020 6:41 PM

Daze
Replies: 7

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What is the bore and the stroke of the MC and what is the bore of the SC?

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Home made cam bearing tool » 9/23/2020 3:37 PM

Daze
Replies: 8

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This 351W project has me messing with all kinds of stuff.  when I tore the engine down I threw together a quick a dirty tool to get the bearings out but I wanted something more professional to install the new bearings so as not to damage them.  Most of the tools on the market were either Chevy specific or universal... in other words "one size fits none"  I was about to give up and buy a universal tool when I found a video on youtube of a guy using a SBF specific cam tool with 5 pucks and a cone. (for those of you that don't know each cam bearing from the front to the back gets about .015" smaller than the one before it)  I new immediately that that was the tool I wanted even at $160.00 BUT I could not find one.  Every site that had them for sale listed them as "out of stock"   Not one to take no for an answer I decided to make my own.  I started by measuring all 5 bearing journals in the block then measured the bearing lobes on a cam.  I used the cam measurements rather then measuring the inside of the actual bearings because I figured the bearings might compress slightly due to the press fit once installed and I wanted to have a size that I knew could easily be removed from an installed bearing.  I then took a piece of 2.25" aluminum round stock cut it up into 6 pieces so I could machining them.  The first one replaces the cone and fits in the #1 journal without a bearing.  It has a hole in it to center the shaft when driving in bearings 5-2.  I machined the 5 bearing pucks biggest to smallest that way if I messed up and cut one too small it could be used for the next size down.  That turned out to be a good plan as I cut to much off of puck 3 which is now puck 4.  I then fabricated a steel cap that bolts to each puck and that the rod slides into, that way the head of the tool is removable to make it easier to use.  I am very happy with the result.  Did a test run with one of the old bearings and all worked as it should.  The entire project took me

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Shop project variable speed band saw » 9/23/2020 3:02 PM

Daze
Replies: 26

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I used the same setup and put one of these motors on my lathe.  AMAZING!!!!  
I wish I had done this years ago.  My lathe/mill is a harbor freight unit and has served me well for 10+ years, but recently I upgraded from the 3" chuck to a 5" chuck and I did the treadmill motor swap and these are both mods I wish I had done a long time ago.  It's like having a totally different machine.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/21/2020 1:28 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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If you read all 6 pages of that thread the guy that makes his living building stroked 351s uses F4 blocks as long as they are not cracked and he builds some crazy big motors for all kinds of applications.  This design is identical to the 302 roller block other than being slightly wider and taller for the increased stroke, so its not a design flaw.  These block are not "prone to failure" If they were he would not be building them.  These cracks clearly happened at the factory, either at casting or machining.  I don't think I would build a cracked block 351w (only talking about the cam bearing crack) but I totally think you could and I would say you have a 99% chance of it NOT failing.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » MS.......what was the dimensions of your new garage....again?! » 9/20/2020 3:17 PM

Daze
Replies: 34

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MS wrote:

Daze, I have been looking for that pic of the bash guys. I have a place reserved in the new shop. Can you send me a high def copy?

I have one where the resolution is higher but not by a ton.  What emails address would you like it sent to?
 

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Hey, Day? » 9/17/2020 8:45 PM

Daze
Replies: 5

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I am only 3 years late seeing this post and replying to it.  At one point in my life that was my beer of choice.  It's good stuff.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » MS.......what was the dimensions of your new garage....again?! » 9/17/2020 8:35 PM

Daze
Replies: 34

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no matter how big it is, it's never big enough.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7252/DKSTRa.jpg


This was when I was residing my house 15 years ago. since then  I have added a 10 X 20 shop space and a lift for the Mustang.  The car lives 5' off the ground and I have tones of stuff under it on wheels, AND I still don't have enough space... not even close.

Then there is my favorite garage picture
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img191/3375/dazegarage.jpg

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/17/2020 7:56 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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The funny thing is, this was an “extra motor” that I was just kind of playing with and wasn’t planning to dive into but then  I found all that crap in the bottom of the pan. Now since I am replacing all the bearings the rings, and the cam I might as well pull the aluminum heads off of the other 351 and make this the engine that’s going into the Galaxie. We will see.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/17/2020 6:49 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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TKOPerformance wrote:

I would let the machine shop inspect the bores and decide whether or not it should be honed or bored.  I get that it seems like a waste of money because it had good compression, but ring seal is the only thing in an engine that really matters.  To do all this work and have even slightly less than optimal ring seal would IMO be the definition of false economy. 

Picked the block up today  They cleaned it, magnafluxed it, inspected it and honed it for me. All looks good and they said “perfect candidate for a rering”.

I need to order some rings and put this engine back together!!!!

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/15/2020 12:57 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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TKOPerformance wrote:

I would have the block Mangafluxed to be sure there are no cracks you cannot see with the naked eye. 

As I said a few posts up it went to the machine shop yesterday to be hot tanked and magnafluxed.  I did some basic tests before it went in and everything seamed strait and true.  The compression was good before I pulled it apart so I am going to put it back together with new gaskets and bearings.  Haven't decided on the rings yet, I may get a ball hone and replace the rings or I may just put it back together with the rings that came out.  
 

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/15/2020 12:52 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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This was my reply to that exact thread.  it was not well received but I stand by it.

Daze post as DazeCars on the 5th page of that thread wrote:

as important and informitive as this post is I think the concern has been overblown and a little perspecitive would help.

There are two separate issues here. The first is if you are building a high power engine than this block cracked or not is not your best choice. I totally agree that Strokeme totally made the correct decision in not rebuilding these blocks. For my business personally I would never let anything but the best go out to a customer as its my reputation on the line. I also think that letting people know about this crack is good info to get out there so those building a performance 351 know what to look for. 

With that said I think this post has become more than was intended. In this thread Strokeme states that he has never seen one of these fail, in other words all the engine blocks he has seen like this came into the shop had nothing more than a crack. Also Strokeme made the statement that a lot of builders probably wouldn't even notice the crack as it is not a normal place to check so there are probably a lot of 351s out there built up that have that crack. I spent a lot of time on-line looking, and I could not find a singe instance where this crack ran and caused issues, not one. People talk about 302s coming apart and most of those cases can be attributed to boring the block out further than they should, the 302 is also a much weaker block than the 351 from the factory and is being pushed higher than it should be IMHO.

[color=#383a3b]Another way to look at it, two things cause cracks on a running engine the first is heat/thermal cycle and the second is stress from combustion. Being in the center of the block heat is obviously not the cause as the center of the engine will cool slower than any other part of the engine and the hottest

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/14/2020 10:30 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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Nos681 wrote:

Which cam bearings failed?

2, 3, and 4. I think the article’s theory about abused and low oil engines causing the crack is not a good theory. I think it is a factory defect that happened when the block was machined by Ford. I don’t think it would cause catastrophic failure and that these motors have this issue their entire service life.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 9/14/2020 10:03 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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Thanks for the heads up, I had already seen that article and that was the first thing I checked after pulling the cam bearings. Didn’t see any cracks. Took the block to the machine Shop to be hot tanked and magnafluxed

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Shop project variable speed band saw » 9/01/2020 8:18 PM

Daze
Replies: 26

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I added one more component.  If you turn the dial all the way down the motor turns off but the circuit still has power and I didn't want to burn anything up so I purchased some 110AC LEDs and wired one to the switch so  when the switch is on, even if the motor is not running, I have indication that the system is still on. 

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/158/F5n9g2.jpg

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Wish me good luck » 9/01/2020 2:26 PM

Daze
Replies: 54

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Hope it works and that you get to feeling better.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Shop project variable speed band saw » 8/30/2020 10:10 AM

Daze
Replies: 26

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DC wrote:

KB ELECTRONICS  is your friend for DC motor controls. They have all kinds of speed and torque controls.                                                                                                   

Thanks for the info.  I had never heard of them before.  I looked them up and it looks like they have lots of good options, but with prices between $100 and $300 I think I will stick with the budget friendly DIY controllers

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Shop project variable speed band saw » 8/30/2020 9:30 AM

Daze
Replies: 26

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Nos681 wrote:

When you “zero the pot”, are placing it at max resistance or minimum?

Could you place a momentary push button across the two legs of the potentiometer? (Short across)
Or “in-line” on a leg of potentiometer? (Open up)
Then you wouldn’t have to always turn the potentiometer back to zero once you have your blade speed setup...”Just push the button to restart”....Wa La!

It doesn't quite work that way.  A pot has three terminals.  The resistance is between the outside terminals and the middle terminal.  As you turn the knob the resistance between one outside terminal and the inside terminal decreases but the resistance between the other outside terminal and the inside terminal increases.  All tree terminals are used. H and L attach to the outside terminals and W attaches to the middle.  Swapping H and L on the pot determines if the knob turns clockwise or counterclockwise to increase speed.
 

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 8/30/2020 8:58 AM

Daze
Replies: 44

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I would have pulled the oil pan sooner. I didn't know there was a problem until I pulled it and foud the babbitt in the bottom. As soon as I saw it I knew the engine needed further investigation.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » I have never seen this in an oil pan!!!! » 8/29/2020 3:51 PM

Daze
Replies: 44

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I am thrilled this whole thing happened. What a fantastic learning experience. The engine was a spare and I never put it in a car so there was no lost time there.  Not only did I see somthing I had never seen before but I also learned several ways to change cam bearings with out farming it out to the shop.  It's just one more thing I can add to my knowledge base.

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Shop project variable speed band saw » 8/29/2020 3:26 PM

Daze
Replies: 26

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MS wrote:

A long time ago, Mr Tim (remember him?) 

I guess that would not work in an AC bandsaw ? Just curious.

I original purchased one of these (sounds a lot like what you are talking about.)
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4279/GPqGCV.jpg


It didn't work very well and after doing some research I found that it would drastically shorten the life of the AC motor.   

FYI Ford, Classic Mustang Tech Discussion » Shop project variable speed band saw » 8/29/2020 3:20 PM

Daze
Replies: 26

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Nos681 wrote:

I made it to SCR.

Any schematics so we can understand the wiring?

The SCRs came with wiring diagrams but they both hooked up almost the same.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/235/RwM9NB.jpg



https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2029/w0qyQA.jpg

Then you take the two AC output wires or the one output wire and the common and they go the the rectifier.  This converts AC to DC and from there you go to the motor.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2318/vxSUBk.jpg


Make sense?

Board footera


REMEMBER!!! When posting a question about your Mustang or other Ford on this forum, BE SURE to tell us what it is, what year, engine, etc so we have enough information to go on.