FYI FORD - MustangSteve's Ford Mustang Forum
The Internet's Most Knowledgeable Classic Mustang Information
IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION ABOUT CLASSIC FORD MUSTANGS, YOU HAVE COME TO THE RIGHT PLACE!
MustangSteve has over 30 years of Mustang experience, having owned 30 of them and restored several others. With the help of other Mustangers, this site is dedicated to helping anyone wanting to restore or modify their Mustang.... THERE ARE NO DUMB QUESTIONS!!!!!
Visit MustangSteve's web site to view some of my work and find details for:
FYIFORD Contributors' PICTURES - Power Brake Retrofit Kits for 65-66 Stangs - Classic Mustang FAQ's by MustangSteve - How to wire in a Duraspark Ignition - Mustang Ride Height Pictures and Descriptions - Steel Bushings to fit Granada Spindles to Mustang Tie Rods - Visit my EBAY store MustangSteve Performance - How to Install Granada Disc Brakes MustangSteve's Disc Brake Swap Page - FYIFORD Acronyms for guide to all the acronyms used on this page - FYIFORD Important information and upcoming events

You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

11/21/2020 9:46 PM  #1


Classic Vehicles and Reliability

After seeing someone discuss carrying spare parts such as fuel pumps with them in the trunk, it made me wonder what sort of issues people have had with their classic vehicles. Do you find yourself stuck on the side of the road often enough to carry an inventory of spare parts at all times? Do you carry spare parts with you in your late model vehicles?
Personally I always thought that if you restored the vehicle, you replace all the items that are worn out and/or suspect. I have gone right through my Mustang and replaced most things that needed replacing. I even replaced somethings just because I thought that 56 years was good enough and I wanted to err on the side of caution. Surely by doing this, the classic vehicle should be "as new" and it should be about as reliable as a late model vehicle (provided that you regularly service and maintain it, as you would with a late model vehicle)? Am I being too optimistic with this way of thinking?
After owning classic vehicles for all my driving life so far, I am starting to come to the conclusion that these old things were built quite well and have certainly stood the test of time. They were quite simplistic in design and I feel that they were quite reliable. I never heard of issues such as overheating etc back in the day and I wonder if this one issue (which seems to be more frequently discussed on forums) is a result of complicating the cooling system with aluminum radiators and electric fans etc? I only ever had mine overheat one time and that was a result of the radiator being long overdue for a flush (my fault as I neglected this). It was an easy fix though and I have not had an issue since.
For the last few years, I always thought that I would convert to EFI once the Autolite Carburetor quit on me, but after listening to some people's experiences, I have decided that I will keep my car with a carburetor. Again I am thinking more along the lines that Ford built the thing with a carburetor, it goes well with a carburetor, so why add complexities to a simplistic design? Again, this is just my opinion and something that I am working out for myself. I am in no way critisizing what others have done on their cars.
Anyway, I just saw this being discussed in another topic and wanted to see if I am missing something? I just don't carry any spare parts with me when I drive my car, so I wondered if you guys have had experiences that I haven't had yet?

Last edited by Toploader (11/21/2020 9:51 PM)


1964-1/2 D Code Coupe - 289 V8 - 4 Speed - Autolite 4100 Carb, 15" tires, Pertronix ignition
 

11/21/2020 10:40 PM  #2


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I think a lot of us, Top, make our own troubles...I know I certainly do because I simply can't leave "well enough" alone.  A properly restored early Mustang should and will travel cross country with minimum issues just like any other well maintained car.  And if you think about it, most restomod Mustangs are really just improved stock.  OD transmission, better brakes, roller cam 5.0 which is really just an improved version of the 221/260/289.  But all this stuff isn't high-tech, just newer versions of the same "old" tech. 
The problem, if it is a problem, is that some of us just can't say "good enough".  I certainly can't.  I'm just compelled to make it better, safer, more convenient, more comfortable, or failing those, I just like messing with it.  For me having a stock restoration...and I have had a one, once....a long time ago...for about six months...is a really good idea and I have promised myself that the next one will be.  But in the end having a stocker all restored and nice is just like having a new car for me.  I can drive it, put gas in it, wash it, look at it.  But its not "mine".  Even though I did all the work it was just cleaning up what someone else figured out.  Customization, either my sorta subtle type or the full-on totally unique crazy paint job type is what some of us just gotta do.  But you don't and nobody here will say anything but "man, that nice.  Good job."  It's a personal thing.
As for spare parts needed?  Well on the first trip to Denver the Heap quit due to an over stressed hot lead to the coil.  Got a flatbed tow (cell phone and Hagarty) to a nearby shop and between him and me we found and fixed it in about ten minutes.  No parts required.
The only other problem of significance was the front end trying to fall off on the way to Fort Walton Beach in '17.  That was a result of the alignment guy giving me "as much caster as he could" which I asked for.  I guess neither he nor I realized that there really is a limit with shims.  No spare parts required as the shims ended up in the factory supplied trough in the frame just under the UCA (thank you Barry for finding those), just BB2Bearing Bob's floor jack...yes he travels with one in his Mach 1...and a bunch of hand tools which he and I both had.  And, traveling companions like RV6, Josh-Kebob, Bearing Bob and three patient ladies all of whom were there to make a potential disaster just another Bash trip story.
But...I still carry electronic ignition parts, a spare Walbro pump, and a bag of tools.  "Hope for the best, plan for the worst."  Jack Reacher

BB1

Last edited by Bullet Bob (11/21/2020 10:47 PM)


"you get what you pay for, good work isn't cheap, and there are NO free lunches...PERIOD!"
 

11/21/2020 11:36 PM  #3


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

In over 50 years of ownership of mine, and over 500,000 miles, I have only been sidelined twice.  Both in the last two years.  The first was about 2 years ago.  I had just installed a new gas tank along with a FiTech FI.  On the way back to my mechanic for a check up, the engine began losing power.  Gradually it became worse until it would not run.  So for the first time it was towed.  Problem?  there was some dirt  in the new tank that clogged the new in-line fuel filter.

The other time was just a few months ago after having reinstalled my leaky radiator that I had fixed. I was out driving when I heard a shooshing sound under the hood.  The upper radiator hose had come loose.  I had not slid it fully onto the rad inlet pipe.  Fortunately there was a convenience store about a half mile away.  6-8 bottles of water got me enough to get home.

Not bad for several coast to coast trips and 35k-40k miles/year for 12 years in LA freeways at rush hour.

I always carry a tool kit, but have only used it to help others.

Last edited by lowercasesteve (11/21/2020 11:40 PM)


Original owner - 351w,T-5, 4whl disks, power R&P
 

11/22/2020 7:45 AM  #4


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I find that when I carry spare parts and tools I don't actually need them.  I do this on any long trip, in any vehicle.  The only exception was when I still had points in my '67.  I always had a spare set with condenser and a feeler gauges and screwdriver in the glove box.  I changed then 3 or 4 times on the side of the road, in a parking lot, etc.  Once I went to electronic ignition she's been basically drop dead reliable. 

 

11/22/2020 8:45 AM  #5


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

The more complicated, the more there is to fail. A good example is a 1937 Allis-Chalmers WC that I still own from the long gone family farm. The most complicated part on it is the magneto which has points that might fail someday. I just used it yesterday to move a trailer. Second or third pull on the crank it's ready for work after sitting for more than a year.

If it was a little faster on the road, I would drive it too a bash.

Last edited by red351 (11/22/2020 8:46 AM)

 

11/22/2020 8:47 AM  #6


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Spare tire and jack, drive belt, tools, and small amount of fluids for topping off, timing light (sometimes).

I believe most of my breakdowns were from lack of knowledge ( to make repairs or unaware of problem existing) and/or lack of funds to make necessary repairs (saving up to do it right).

Of course the car will overheat with a bad water pump, clogged radiator, and incorrect timing.
Of course I will have to stop because I have old tires and they slowly leak while on interstate.
Of course I will have to stop because the new power steering hose was defective.
Of course I will have to stop because I ran out of gas.
Of course I will have to stop...with parking brake...because broken transverse muffler damaged the rear brake line at a gas station just before getting onto interstate.

I’m still learning.


Dan - A9L/5.0/T5/3.25 Currie 8” TL/2016 Mustang GT brakes - I’m further north than some Canadians.
 

11/22/2020 9:04 AM  #7


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Nos681 wrote:

Spare tire and jack, drive belt, tools, and small amount of fluids for topping off, timing light (sometimes).

I believe most of my breakdowns were from lack of knowledge ( to make repairs or unaware of problem existing) and/or lack of funds to make necessary repairs (saving up to do it right).

Of course the car will overheat with a bad water pump, clogged radiator, and incorrect timing.
Of course I will have to stop because I have old tires and they slowly leak while on interstate.
Of course I will have to stop because the new power steering hose was defective.
Of course I will have to stop because I ran out of gas.
Of course I will have to stop...with parking brake...because broken transverse muffler damaged the rear brake line at a gas station just before getting onto interstate.

I’m still learning.

Its all part of it.  I once got left on a backroad in the dark at about 11:00PM because I put a new alternator in and incorrectly assumed that the post for the stator got the ring terminal left on the harness I couldn't identify.  It did NOT.  That ring terminal was for a case ground, and the stator post got nothing unless you had a stator driven tach (I did not).  Wiring it the way I did ensured that it didn't charge.  I hitched a ride to a friend's house and called home (no cell phone as a 16 year old kid), Dad came to get me and towed me back home.  On the following Monday we towed the car to an old mechanic we knew and he took one look at it and said "what did you put a wire on the stator terminal for?"  Unhooked it and it charged just fine.  I didn't figure out what that ring terminal really did for over 20 years. 
 

 

11/22/2020 9:15 AM  #8


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

red351 wrote:

The more complicated, the more there is to fail. A good example is a 1937 Allis-Chalmers WC that I still own from the long gone family farm. The most complicated part on it is the magneto which has points that might fail someday. I just used it yesterday to move a trailer. Second or third pull on the crank it's ready for work after sitting for more than a year.

If it was a little faster on the road, I would drive it too a bash.

When I was a kid we had an old John Deere, I believe it was a model H.  Built sometime in the '39-'47 time frame.  Big 2 cylinder engines.  As kids we used to call it "Pop" because that's what it sounded like with that gargantuan 2 cylinder turning like 100rpm due to a flywheel that probably weighed 500lbs.  We cut our field with it for years until someone saw it from the road and wanted to buy it to restore it.  You had to love the simplicity and toughness of all those machines from that era.  My current tractor was built in '92, also a JD & a 2 cylinder, but much more complicated.  Everything is hydraulic and I've had to replace every hose on it over the years, half the lift cylinders, etc.
 

 

11/22/2020 9:19 AM  #9


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Automotive design is more refined now than it was in years past.

Since my mustang is still scattered across the attic and garage I can’t speak to it.

I do have an early 1980’s GM pickup that I drive often, and on 100+ mile trips.  I always carry a spare alternator belt.  Reason why is that v belts are inferior to a modern serpentine belt with tensioner. If things are not quite perfect it fails.  Twin batteries, Diesel engine, large alternator and one single v belt- not the best design.  Another thing is that just because a part is new does not mean it is good.  So many of the repop parts are questionable.  Add in parts like electromechanical voltage regulators, points, aged wiring, mystery quality fuel hose, ethanol laced fuel, older designs, and human error.  Adds up to me carrying a tool kit and a few parts.

And yes I carry a few tools and parts in my late model vehicle too.  Back when I had a modern common rail diesel I always carried a fuel filter.

Last edited by Bentworker (11/22/2020 9:22 AM)

 

11/22/2020 10:55 AM  #10


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I carry minimal tools on trips.  I figure that, if I take tools, I am planning on working on something. I do not plan to have to work on my car during a trip.

My theory is to do my best when putting it together, test everything, then go for it. The only trouble on the road I have ever had was a bad battery. 

The ones I see on the side of the road are typically (but not always) from poor workmanship. Like a wire that magically came undone or got against a hot manifold and shorted, or a hose routed too close to sharp edges or hot exhaust.  Or a bolt that mysteriously fell out. 

No Mustang ever stopped running because it had a carb on it. Nor has one ever quit running because it had EFI on it.  It quit because somebody didn’t do something right.  So, in most cases, failures are caused by human error, not mechanical parts.  So, take your time, assemble it the best you can, test it out, then head to the bash.  Or whatever your life’s dream of a road trip may be.

Everyone will help out if you DO have a problem on the road.  But, it is your responsibility to do your best effort to NOT have a problem on the road.


Money you enjoy wasting is NOT wasted money... unless your wife finds out.
 

11/22/2020 11:30 AM  #11


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I do carry my AAA card!  I don't carry a spare in my 66 and my 91 S-10 still has the factory spare under the bed (never been on the ground)
Crazy?!!..........nawwwwww. If it breaks I either fix it....... or get it towed.
I tend to not worry about 'stuff'.
Whistling-by-the-graveyard?! Maybe...
I do pray alot before I go on a trip.
I prepare as best I can before I leave and I do carry hand tools spare belt tape.war -and-such.

Don't sweat the small stuff and............
it's all small stuff!
It almost bit me on my trip to FWB(MSBB 2017) butt width the help of my 'best bud' who happened to be traveling with me.....he saved me. (ever since then I DO carry a bottle jack!

HEY!!...........If UR not living on the edge......
UR taking up too much room!!
6sal6


Get busy Liv'in or get busy Die'n....Host of the 2020 Bash at the Beach/The only Bash that got cancelled  )8
 

11/22/2020 12:34 PM  #12


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Love all the input you guy share. I too carry fluids like water, 50/50, trans and oil all tucked in the right rear quarter under my spare. I never used to carry a spare tire back in the day and really don't recall ever needing one but I now have a space saver in the trunk just because.  I have the points set and a used fuel pump tucked away somewhere in there too, along with the breakdown floor jack. I have my old hoses and belts under the tire.Tools are in soft bags to save space.  Every nook and cranny has something. I even have a 4' LED light against the back of the rear seat with a 8' pigtail for light if needed.If you plan right you will be fine.
When I overheated in Montana this year I had the tools and repaired the problem on the side of the road in about 1 HOT hour. Why the clip fell off the fan blade I don't know but it was in the bottom of the shroud, so I safety wired it back on and it has never come off since. Used some of the 50/50 I carried too. I agree do it right the first time. We each have a suitcase and I have one empty for buying  keepsakes on the way. Call me weird but i don't like things in the back seat except the small 12v cooler for H2o, meds  and jackets. If it dont fit in the trunk it shouldn't go. 


Just when I thought I wasn't spending $$$ The gremlins came back
 

11/22/2020 1:17 PM  #13


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I think *when* you take your vehicle out after major work is important. We are all human and jumping on the freeway after a full restoration might not be the best idea. Too many of those stupid full resto in 14 day timeframe to drive from NY to LA etc etc. shows contribute to that mentality. Once you get some local close-to-home mileage on the vehicle, ensure it's tuned, and re-torque everything then you should be good for ever increasing trip lengths. At least that's my strategy. Also road side assistance for *any* vehicle is good to have.

 

11/22/2020 1:42 PM  #14


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

So far the 67 has been very reliable meaning it has never left me stranded. I ran out of gas once and was lucky to be across the street from a gas station. It would not start one morning to take me to work even though it ran great the night before. The points needed adjustment and she ran good again. Twice I have had the vacuum advance can fail causing weird ignition problems. It would run good but miss and fart under load. I burned out the brake light switch on the return from Fort Walton only to find human error caused a wire to be shorted by the clutch pedal. I rigged up my remote start switch taped it to the shifter and manually pressed the button for brake lights the rest of the way home.
I carry a roll of wire, connectors, tape, belts, coolant, oil, points, rotor, condenser and misc other small parts. I have enough tools to fix darn near everything on the car. It does not take many tools to cover most basic needs in the Mustang. Included in the tools is a VOM and timing light. Why do I carry a timing light? Who knows.
I figure if on the road to somewhere I can always get towed to someplace with a parts store to get things like starters, alternators, etc.
I have always carried tools on trips no matter what I'm driving. I feel it is better to have them and not need them, then to not have them and need them.


Gary Zilik - Pine Junction, Colorado - 67 Coupe, 289-4V, T5
 

11/22/2020 1:50 PM  #15


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

my brother bought a new 69 hurst olds, left el paso got to deming new mexico and a valve spring broke it sat for two days, waiting on parts to come in. even new can break, rebuilt sitting in my trunk? iffy at best. sometimes you just don't know and if you do break down it's only a guess as to what it's going to be.
 

 

11/22/2020 2:14 PM  #16


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I always carry tools no matter what vehicle I drive on long trips. Prefer to rely on myself when sumptin breaks. Limped into an O'Reilly's in Cuba, MO one evening. F150 fuel pump gave up the ghost. Changed in the parking lot and was on my way. The mustang has extra fuses, tail light bulbs and a quart of oil along for the ride.


.......common sense is a flower that doesn’t grow in everyone’s garden.......
 

11/22/2020 4:03 PM  #17


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

I've been known to carry a few spare parts and tools, but never the ones needed for wheel bearing repairs I was a boy scout and believe in their motto. I figure if I've got the room for tools and parts, why not take them and not be at the mercy of someone else?


Bob. 69 Mach 1, 393W, SMOD Toploader, Armstrong  steering.
 

11/22/2020 5:51 PM  #18


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

In my younger days . my Mustangs left me on a regular basis.
Just a few examples,
Ran out of gas when fuel gauge said 1/4 tank.
Alternator not charging battery Uh oh points in voltage regulator failed.
Front spindle broke off at inner wheel bearing  ( 6 Cyl Car)

These are just a few that I remember.
And all of these cars were in the ten year old time frame.
Fast forward to 2020, now we are talking about 50+ year old automobiles.
We modify and modify. I have accepted that I will not be driving a new "66 vert.
Just a refreshed one.
I remember maybe 25 years ago a Model A Car show in Ponchatoula.
Many beautiful cars, but one sticks in my mind.
A 1930 roadster that looked like nothing had been done to it since Henry kicked out the door
Talked to the owner who at the time was about ( well let"s say well matured.)
He told me he had crossed the country in it 4 times.
I was amazed
He did'nt think that was unusual just loved every minute of the journey.

cman


 

 

11/22/2020 9:05 PM  #19


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Thanks for the posts. It has been interesting to read them.
At the moment I only carry some fuses, a wheel brace, spare tire, a jack and a wrench to tighten the battery cables. That is about all I have ever carried, even on a cross Country trip. I think I might add in a couple of screwdrivers, a couple more wrenches, alternator belt and the spare Pertronix module sitting on the shelf. I don't ever see myself ever carrying parts like fuel pumps, wheel bearings, radiator hoses or spare rear axle https://cdn.boardhost.com/emoticons/grin.png
(couldn't resist)... Other than that, I think I will either call a buddy or get a tow home / mechanic shop.
I understand what some say about these things being 55+ years of age now, but I restored my car myself and like to think I have done the restoration thoroughly and with caution. With the electrics (something that's out of my league), I paid someone with automotive electrical experience to test, check and fit relays etc, so I know that is all good. I had a carburetor specialist check the tune on my car, so I know that is all good and I had a shop check over the steering and suspension when it was last in getting a wheel alignment. As I have gotten older, I am more willing to do the work on my car and then get a mechanic shop to inspect and check periodically as a second opinion / second set of eyes looking over the car, just in case I missed something.
I feel that I have done about all I can with my car and like to think it is about as reliable as it can get. I just need to keep up on the maintenance.
 

Last edited by Toploader (11/22/2020 9:09 PM)


1964-1/2 D Code Coupe - 289 V8 - 4 Speed - Autolite 4100 Carb, 15" tires, Pertronix ignition
     Thread Starter
 

11/22/2020 10:00 PM  #20


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

josh-kebob wrote:

I always carry tools no matter what vehicle I drive on long trips. Prefer to rely on myself when sumptin breaks. Limped into an O'Reilly's in Cuba, MO one evening. F150 fuel pump gave up the ghost. Changed in the parking lot and was on my way. The mustang has extra fuses, tail light bulbs and a quart of oil along for the ride.

Mr Tim and I stopped at that same Cuba, Missouri OReilly to buy a battery and rewire the alternator on the 68 convertible I was bringing home to Dallas from Illinois for my friend, Doug!  Small world.  See the article on the website about bringing that car home.


Money you enjoy wasting is NOT wasted money... unless your wife finds out.
 

11/23/2020 1:44 PM  #21


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Most of my headaches have been caused by me making changes to what Ford did. The car left me in a parking lot at the neighborhood Ace when the hydraulic TO bearing self-adjusted itself out too far and popped the seal. After the repair, bleeding I out was a major PITA. Self-adjusting caused by trans cross member rubbing on transmission case.
 
I ran out of gas before we made the Glen Rose trip. I left the shop for the front end alignment to run another errand before I went back home. Gas gauge was not down to empty yet, but was close. It made a hesitations and I got it into a parking lot before it died. Opened the gas cap to find a vacuum on the tank….had to nip a grove in the seal to allow it to breath. AAA Gold to the rescue for both of those. Gold status gets 4 free tows up to 100 miles each per person on the account. I highly recommend it.
 
I had 365 miles on the Mustang when we went to Glen Rose and had all the confident feelings for someone that didn’t know any better!! Took a full tool box, electrical tape, splices, and a wiper motor. Thankfully it was not that far of a drive. Other than tire rub, the only mechanical issue I had was from showing my backside leaving the burger joint like most of the others on Friday afternoon. Popped a heater hose off about 4500 RPM in second gear. It was an odd feeling to realize that green stuff that hit the windshield was antifreeze!!! Barry was riding with me when it happened. We coasted up the road to the nearest convenience store to get some water and get the hose back on. I had used the spring clamps on all the hoses and they were not up to the task!!! They all got replaced with worm clamps when I got back to town.
 
I follow the same logic of having the tools with me so I don’t need them. Spare parts consist of fuses that I might not find at a parts house. I don’t have a spare tire or a jack and don’t know if I will add them. If I’m running with Coupe daddy, I can borrow his….hopefully!!!
 
I can verify that new parts aren’t always good parts. My dimmer switch, wiper motor switch, and ignition switch are all examples. The new ignition switch from Painless was broke before it made it onto the car. The dimmer switch never worked new out of the box, I reused the one Ford put in the car in December of 66. It’s still doing OK. The new wiper switch showed signs of failure on the first drive in the rain a few days before we left for Glen Rose. The wipers would stop in the middle of a pass. The old switch went back in for that too.
 
Nothing was going to help the busted crank shaft.
 
I will do the best work I can to make it dependable then say a prayer before we head out.


John  -- 67 Mustang Coupe 390 5 speed
 

11/23/2020 2:01 PM  #22


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Back in the day I used to hop into my ten year old cars from the fifties, 54 Chevy, 57 Ford ,52 Hudson and drive all over Pa to go hunting and fishing. Never carried a spare part or even a tool and if memory serves me right I never got stranded. Same with my present 66 hot rod. Only one time, the rear brakes were locked up so bad it wouldn’t move. Turned out it was my fault. Not enough clearance between master and booster. I’ve got a motor with 100k on it and most of the original wiring and I’ll drive it anywhere.


"anyone that stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty"Henry Ford
 

11/24/2020 12:11 PM  #23


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Back in November 1986 I got back from my tour in Germany.  I was then stationed in Fort Hood TX.  I bought a 1979 Mustang Cobra with no AC up in Wisconsin for my trip to Texas.   About March In TX I was wondering what the hell I was thinking buying a car with no AC and moving to TX...LOL   I made a lot trips back and forth from WI to TX with 302 with the 2 barrel Autolite Carburetor.   One time I had a weekend pass and drove straight through except for gas.   The only problem I ever had was around Fort Worth on the way back to TX I blew a tire.  I had the TRX rims that had odd tires that no one had.  I ended up switching the rims and tires to a more common tire.  Steve69

Last edited by Steve69 (11/24/2020 12:12 PM)

 

11/24/2020 12:13 PM  #24


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

https://i.ibb.co/tYvzrhN/02-25-2011-10-39-44-PM.jpg

 

11/24/2020 6:02 PM  #25


Re: Classic Vehicles and Reliability

Steve69 wrote:

https://i.ibb.co/tYvzrhN/02-25-2011-10-39-44-PM.jpg

Steve69, my first BRAND NEW CAR was a 1979 COBRA Mustang with a 2.3L turbo. 
Your pic brought back memories!


Money you enjoy wasting is NOT wasted money... unless your wife finds out.
 

Board footera


REMEMBER!!! When posting a question about your Mustang or other Ford on this forum, BE SURE to tell us what it is, what year, engine, etc so we have enough information to go on.